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Courtesy of Greg Morton

Standup comedian Greg Morton makes his way to Columbia

Morton answers all of MOVE’s questions before he makes a stop at Deja Vu Nov. 8 - 10.

By Andrea Gonzales-Paul | Nov. 9, 2012

Tags: Comedy

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[MOVE]: How did you first get into comedy?

[Greg Morton]: I was doing a school play and some standup in high school. I

didn’t know you could make it a living until I went to my first comedy show and

then I thought, Oh wow, that’s really a viable vocation.

[M]: What is your favorite part about performing stand-up?

[GM]: When shows go really well, I think those are the best shows or when the

audience allows me to play. I like to improvise, and that’s a lot of fun for me. It’s like

you’re feeling a vibe from them. Everything is magic, and you think, “Wow, this is

great. This is why I love doing this.”

[M]: You did voice-overs for quite a few Saturday morning cartoons and video

games. What was that like?

[GM]: They were great. I worked on "Super Mario Bros.," "Super Mario Bros.

Super Show!" and "Zelda." I was an avid gamer at the time and working on those

games was a dream come true.

[M]: I also hear you were once a DJ ... but not just any DJ, you were “That Crazy

DJ.” How and why were you oh-so crazy?

[GM]: I knew a lot of people who did DJ work, and they would just stand there,

play records and were introverted. I had this idea of fusing entertainment with my

DJ work because a lot of crowds were shy, so I used entertainment to kind of coax

people. I figured it would be kind of infectious, so I created a fun atmosphere for

people to come out. I used to wear costumes and I would perform little skits. That’s

how my stand-up kind of evolved. I mix stand-up and my old DJ routines where I

dress up as these iconic musical artists like (Mick) Jagger, Michael Jackson or Prince and

made them a mashup. That’s how I close my standup routines.

[M]: I’ve seen a YouTube video of you (that

has over 4 million hits) singing a parody about President Obama, whom you

referred to as “Obama Man” to the tune of “The Candy Man” on a radio show. Where

did you get this idea from? And has he contacted you about this?

[GM]: No. He has not contacted me. I was talking to a comedian friend of mine,

and he was saying, “This guy Obama is incredible. He’s kind of like Sammy Davis Jr.”

I go like, “Oh my gosh, that’s a song.” At the time, no one had parodied the president

in any way, and I thought, This is good territory to go into. I’ll make something

that’s really balanced. I wrote the lyrics that night, and I performed it on The Bob &

Tom Show that morning. The first week it went viral, and it got one billion hits a

week. In September, I got a call from Laughing Hyena Records, and we were looking

to get the song put up on iTunes as a single. Unfortunately, the original writers of

the song sold the rights to Mars candy. But it was pretty exciting to me, especially

coming from the background of the music industry, being a disc jockey. But hey,

there’s more where that came from, right?

[M]: So are you going to be writing a sequel now that Obama is in office for a

second term?

[GM]: If something strikes me funny, I will write something. Some people take

politics way too seriously. I see it differently because I’m a comedian. I’m the court

jester. I’m supposed to make fun of the king.

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